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hunger out. pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: jamie williams is a noted author. she is -- amy wilentz is a noted author. her latest revisits the nation of haiti. it is called "farewell, fred voodoo." we should start by talking about the title. >> friend voodoo is a name the international press corps used to name for the haitian on the street. what i would like to say is they are trained to go deeper than that and not just have a stereotypical view of haitians and what old colonists used to associate with their religion, but something real and in control of their own will, so farewell to the old image. let's look get the new -- look at the new haiti. tavis: what would you say is the typical american view? >> there is a lot of reality. impoverished. we associate in the u.s. poverty with backwardness, especially in a nation filled with akron people is american thing. and there is to do, -- is voodoo, and that image of them being associated with religion thought of assets -- as superstition and black magic. i have gone to a lot of voodoo ceremonies, and they are not what
couldn't deny them intellectually. so i adopted them. >> all right. that was a clip from the pbs documentary "makers: women who make america. a film about the evolution of women's roles over the past 50 years. with us, the mother/daughter pair featured in the film, founding editor of "ms." magazine, letty pogrebin and writer abby pogrebin. thanks for being here again. >> thanks for having us. >> i look at that clip, and it's a generational thing. what was radical when you did that was actually pretty normal by the time i grew up. i'd see my dad sitting on the couch and go, can you get me a sandwich? everybody would turn to him and say, get it yourself! it wasn't that way. >> it was very radical at the time. i was working full time. so was he. yet i would come home and bake bread in order to make stuffing for the turkey. >> you didn't even think twice about it, did you? >> no. it just was some role i was born into. and when i became a feminist, i read myself into radicalism. i suddenly looked around and said, this is ridiculous. i can't justify it. and so my husband and i used to
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)